Image: Marsha Richins
Marketing

Marsha Richins

Professor of Marketing and Bailey K. Howard World Book Chair of Marketing
Office
430 Cornell Hall
Hours
By appointment

Marsha Richins is a Professor of Marketing and Bailey K. Howard World Book Chair of Marketing at the Robert J. Trulaske Sr. College of Business, University of Missouri - Columbia. She is past president of the Association for Consumer Research, a Fellow of the Society for Consumer Psychology, and a past Associate Editor for the Journal of Consumer Research. Her research interests include the study of consumer values (especially materialism), the role products play in people's lives, and the influence of advertising on self-perceptions and perceived quality of life. Professor Richins has published in many academic journals, including the Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Marketing, Journal of Consumer Psychology, and American Behavioral Scientist, among others.

Education

PhD, University of Texas at Austin; MBA, University of Texas at Austin; MA, University of Texas at Austin; BA, California State University

Recent Publications

Marsha L. Richins (2017), “Materialism Pathways: The Processes that Create and Perpetuate Materialism,” Journal of Consumer Psychology, 27 (4), 480-499.

Amanda E. Helm, Julie Guidry Moulard, and Marsha L. Richins (2015), “Consumer Cynicism: Developing a Scale to Measure Underlying Attitudes Influencing Marketplace Shaping and Withdrawal Behaviors,” International Journal of Consumer Studies, 39, 515-524.

Richins, Marsha and Lan Chaplin, (2015). “Material Parenting: How the Use of Goods in Parenting Fosters Materialism in the Next Generation,” Journal of Consumer Research, 41(6), 1333-1357 (lead article)

Richins, Marsha L. (2013), “When Wanting Is Better Than Having: Materialism, Transformation Expectations, and Product-Evoked Emotions in the Purchase Process,” Journal of Consumer Research, 40 (June), 1-18 (lead article).

Richins, Marsha L. (2011), "Materialism, Transformation Expectations, and Spending: Implications for Credit Use," Journal of Public Policy and Marketing, 30, 141-156 (lead article).